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Should Churches Pay Taxes?


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11 minutes ago, t*rminated said:

Do you think Churches should be required to pay taxes? Why or why not?

Of course they should. I don't think it is fair for the rest of business owners having to pay high taxes. if the Church contribute more, taxes wouldn't be that high.

 

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A church shouldn't pay taxes because it's not a business. Churches and other places of faith only continue to exist at all because of donations.

Churches, mosques, monasteries, etc. are meant to be places of congregation where practitioners of any one faith are able to learn more about its principles.

They are facilities of spiritual enrichment and a greater exploration of one's purpose and to try and find meaning in the grand scheme of creation. This is all without any personal cost imposed upon those believers.

This is also why separation between church and state exists: Religious leaders cannot directly influence how the governance of a nation that is a Democratic Republic.

Vise-versa, no government can disallow or interfere with the practices of any one organization of faith. Forcing a taxation on churches, when they have no stable income outside of voluntary donations.

The act of asking for donations at all is supposed to be out of piety, a lowering of one's head in order to learn both humility and that one is at the mercy of the powers that be. The act of voluntarily donating is also a pious act, as it is an exercise representative of one's conviction towards their faith and the ability to choose to act with genuine compassion. 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/30/2021 at 8:15 AM, SummertimmeSahneh said:

Of course they should. I don't think it is fair for the rest of business owners having to pay high taxes. if the Church contribute more, taxes wouldn't be that high.

 

Yes. I think so too.  Because MOST churches have violated the Lemon Test and Establishment Clause therefore they should be forced to pay. I think the US government needs to be very strict on small and Mega Churches alike on whether they SHOULD be exempt or not. For the most part. There's a church in town where they ab**e donations and tithes. It doesn't go to help people. It just goes to remodel the church every year. They're not putting the money to a good and honest use. All I've seen the Pastor and his supporters do is buy, buy, and buy. They need to be taxed, taxed, and taxed some more. 

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Religious organizations across the United States have received at least $7.3 billion in forgivable government loans from the Paycheck Protection Program. The top loan recipients are, of course, of the majority religion. Megachurches with outspoken Trump-supporting pastors have received millions of dollars in loans, and churches tied to ***ual ab**e and financial scandals also took advantage of the free money.

This is a clear violation of the Lemon Test and of the Establishment Clause. The grants given to churches obviously do not have a clearly secular purpose, so it fails the first part of the test. The handouts advance the interests of the religious organizations that receive them, and I’m not sure how anyone could argue that the aid does not create unnecessary entanglement between church and state.

Article: https://antidote.substack.com/p/its-time-for-churches-to-pay-taxes

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Coupal24 said:

Yes I do not go to church because they always ask for money. Does not mean I do not believe in god. But going to church and paying them does not guarantee you will go to heaven. 

Duly noted.

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“Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven." - Matthew 7:21

I grew up studying the bible. My mom made me do the youth group. When I lived with my father, he taught anthropology and evolution in college and then he made me go to church with him. It was confusing. But I did not believe in it. It came off as a fairy tale and none of the characters in the bible were ever historically verified. So when I turned 18. I sat down and told her that I'm an Atheist and that I need strong physical and empirical evidence. That reading this book and hearing multiple pastors and reverends preaching while I was  growing up. That this was not enough to convince me. While I am knowledgeable of Christian Mythology. I refuse to worship an imaginary and mythological deity or partake in any kind of religion. If there was strong evidence that was left behind. Sure. I would be devout. But I can't go off theological claims and assertions. 

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Here's what I found:

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Tax exemptions of different types were common in the Colonial period. After the Revolution and the ratification of the Bill of Rights, most states retained these exemptions. State and local governments continue to exempt churches from local taxation. In 1913 the federal government embraced this trend by exempting churches and other religious organizations from federal taxation in the modern federal tax code.

Under the federal scheme, all nonprofits that abide by certain regulations are exempt from federal taxes. Donations made to such groups are likewise tax-deductible for the donor. Churches and religious organizations receive these and some other benefits. For example, churches are not required to file tax returns or apply for tax-exempt status.

The Internal Revenue Service automatically considers churches exempt (though many churches file anyway in an effort to assuage concerns of donors.) The reasoning behind making churches tax-exempt and unburdened by IRS procedures stems from a First Amendment-based concern to prevent government involvement with religion. By avoiding initial inquiries into churches’ validity as houses of worship, government avoids violating the churches’ free-exercise right to define and regulate themselves. Legislators have also responded to public sentiment that churches provide a valuable function in the community, and therefore should receive benefits that other charitable organizations enjoy.

Specific IRS interpretations and codes distinguish between churches and religious organizations. There are additional rules for religious institutions
that engage in business dealings unrelated to their ministry. Such business ventures may be taxed by the government.

So taxing a church is like stripping them of their freedom to religion, it's harder to worship when you're religion itself has to pay to exist ~

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